Tuesday, August 22, 2006

Class Test

Class Test at Windsted / Newton:
Saturday 02/09/2006 .

1. Investment/
2.Time Management
3.Psychology
4.Financial Planning
5.Globalization


Finally,
e-mail to: foooyo@yahoo.com
-identify who u are
-list down the 5 things above
-Promise that u have follow instructions

Have a nice day!

ps* foooyo - Got 3 "o" not 2.

Friday, August 04, 2006

Morningstar Guide to Mutual Funds


With so many complex changes in the sophisticated world of investing, people are now looking for much more than a simple introduction to mutual funds.
Morningstar Guide to Mutual Funds, Second Edition has been completely revised and updated to meet the needs of today’s demanding investor.
This book outlines the latest tools and techniques needed to analyze and select mutual funds. It includes an introductory material as well as more advanced topics.


It also guides readers to take an objective and informed look at their investments and learn what mutual funds are, when and how they should be used, and what the pros and cons of investing in them.

Through lively anecdotes and a clear presentation of select financial information, Morningstar Guide to Mutual Funds , will certainly help readers build and maintain a profitable mutual fund portfolio.

Topics discussed throughout this book will show readers how to: find the right fund to meet their investment needs; navigate through the fund-purchase process; conduct quarterly reviews of a fund and fund company; invest in a tax efficient manner, and much more.

Praise for Morningstar Guide to Mutual Funds:
"There's nothing Morningstar doesn't know about mutual funds. And at last, for rewady reference, there's a book. You'll find everything here you need to know about managing fund investments, inside or outside 401(k)."
- Jane Bryant Quinn, Newsweek columnist and author of Making Most of Your Money.

Christine Benz (Chicago, IL) is Editor of Morningstar Mutual Funds, the firm’s flagship print publication as well as Morningstar Funds 500, an annual publication covering 500 top mutual funds. She has worked as a Morningstar analyst and editor since 1993, focusing on growth oriented funds. Benz is widely quoted in the media, and appears regularly on CNBC.

Morningstar Guide to Mutual Funds: Five-Star Strategies for Success, 2nd Edition Christine BenzISBN: 0-471-718327Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons.
256 pagesSeptember 2005

Wednesday, August 02, 2006

Billions - Selling to Chinese Consumers




This book examines on how to market to the new Chinese consumer – all 1.5 billion of them. Tom Doctoroff has his own marketing theories to the Chinese consumer, having spent the last eleven years in Greater China with J. Walter Thompson, one of the region's largest advertising agencies. He has partnered with over fifty PRC clients, both domestic and multinational (e.g . Ford, Shell, Kraft, Unilever, HSBC and China Mobile).

Tom believes that marketing is all about psychology. Not surprising for someone with a research psychology background – he studied BA in psychology from Northwestern University in 1985 and continued to receive his MBA from the University of Chicago in 1989.According to Tom, some of the world's leading brands enter the Chinese market, and try to apply the same Western thinking to the marketplace. They failed miserably.

As such, the author analyzes the psyches of contemporary Chinese consumers and stresses the importance of culture in shaping buying decisions. The book also points the costly blunders into which MNCs often made. For instance, JWT's client Kellogg tried to market cold cereal in China. The fact is, Chinese people don't like cold cereal in the morning. Thus proving his point that Western businesses need to really understand the Chinese consumers' market. 'Billions will be a big help to executives trying to understand their millions of new customers in China. Readers will discover Chinese culture on the road to learning about marketing in China. Tom Doctoroff makes the mysteries of the China market accessible.' - Robyn Meredith, Senior Editor, Asia, Forbes Magazine, Hong Kong

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan (Dec 2005)
Page: 225
ISBN: 1403971692

Monday, July 31, 2006

Buffett donates to Bill and Melinda Foundation

The second richest man in the world, Warren Buffett, announced to the world that he will give away the bulk of his US4 44 billion fortune to a foundation set up by the richest man in the world, Bill Gates and his wife, Melinda. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is probably the largest foundation in the world, with about US$30 billion strong.

Here's an insightful thought from Mr. Warren Buffett…

"I don't believe in creating dynastic wealth. My children have all received money from me and my wife. They will receive more on my death, but they are in the privileged 1 percent at least, of the population, perhaps the top 10th of 1 per cent. Even if they weren't given any money, they've had a huge advantage. I don't think it's in keeping with my view of how the world should operate to create huge amounts of dynastic wealth.

I really believe in terms of having equality of opportunity in this country, and the right people in the right jobs doing the right things, I don't think they should inherit my position in society any more than if I was on the Olympic team 20 years ago as a 100m runner, which will be a little hard for some of you to imagine. I do not believe in inheriting your position in society based on which womb you come from."

Friday, July 28, 2006

A huge donation from Buffett

The second richest man in the world, Warren Buffett, announced to the world that he will give away the bulk of his US$ 44 billion fortune to a foundation set up by the richest man in the world, Bill Gates and his wife, Melinda. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is probably the largest foundation in the world, with about US$30 billion strong.

Here's an insightful thought from Mr. Warren Buffett…

"I don't believe in creating dynastic wealth. My children have all received money from me and my wife. They will receive more on my death, but they are in the privileged 1 percent at least, of the population, perhaps the top 10th of 1 per cent. Even if they weren't given any money, they've had a huge advantage. I don't think it's in keeping with my view of how the world should operate to create huge amounts of dynastic wealth.

I really believe in terms of having equality of opportunity in this country, and the right people in the right jobs doing the right things, I don't think they should inherit my position in society any more than if I was on the Olympic team 20 years ago as a 100m runner, which will be a little hard for some of you to imagine. I do not believe in inheriting your position in society based on which womb you come from."

Friday, July 21, 2006

Jim's Cramer Real Money


Jim Cramer's Real Money
How do you find hot stocks without getting burn?
How do you make your money work for you?
Former hedge-fund manager, cofounder of TheStreet.com, the daily financial news Web site, and cohost of CNBC's Kudlow & Cramer,and seasoned Wall Street commentator, Jim Cramer shows how to invest wisely in today's insane world.

For newbies, Crammer recommends allocating a portion of your assets
to speculation. He tells why "buy and hold" is a lousy and losing philosphy:
For Cramer, it's "buy and homework". Thus, Cramer's approach requires
devoting at least an hour a week to educating yourself about each
stock you own.
Cramer explains the fundamentals of his investment approach, based on the twin principles
of diversification and speculation: while most of your portfolio should include blue-chip
companies, 20% percent of your money should go for a slightly riskier bet on a company's future
("owning a stock is a bet on the future, not the past").

Cramer's 25 rules for investing are explained in this book. The rules are sound and very helpful for the investor to review. They are:
1. Bulls, bears make money, pigs get slaughtered.
2. It's OK to pay the taxes.
3. Don't buy all at once.
4. Buy damaged stocks, not damaged companies.
5. Diversify to control risk
6. Do your stock homework.
7. No one made a dime by panicking.
8. Buy best-of-breed companies.
9. Defend some stocks, not all.
10. Bad buys won't become takeovers.
11. Don't own too many names.
12. Cash is for winners.
13. No woulda, shoulda couldas.
14. Expect, don't fear corrections.
15. Don't forget bonds.
16. Never subsidize losers with winners.
17. Check hope at the door.
18. Be flexible.
19. When the chiefs retreat, so should you.
20. Giving up on value is a sin.
21. Be a TV critic.
22. Wait 30 days after preannouncements
23. Beware of Wall Street hype.
24. Explain your picks.
25. There's always a bull market.

Hardcover: 320 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (March 29, 2005)
Language: English
ISBN: 0743224892

Friday, July 07, 2006

Excerpted from Robert's Miles Book, Warren Buffett Wealth

When the dot.com bubble burst after a period of wide-spread irrational investoe behaviour, Warren Buffett was asked what he thought or what he would say to all those peope who lost money, many their life savings.

Resisting the opportunity to say " I told you so" because he had long preached against investing in anything that you do not understand, he simply said: "If you know what you own, you will be fine."

You run into trouble if you own anything for any other reason. Momentum invstors were hit the hardest because they were investing in something that was going up in price that they did not really understand it.

The worls's greatest investor is often quoted: "I don't understand technology, so I don't invest in it."

Remember that risk comes from not knowing what you are doing. Some of the best advice from Warren: "For some reason, people tak their cues from price action rather than from values. What doesn't work is when you start doing things that you don't understand."

"The dumbest reason for buying a stock is because it is going up. I want to be able to explain my mistakes. This means I only do the things I completely understand."

If Warren were to teach a business school class about wealth building and the stock market, he would simply have the students do one business valuation after another.

Stock market participants need to know the difference between price and value. Price is determined in an auction environment and is set by the last seller and buyer. This may be higher or lower than the value of the stock.

The shrewd investor determines the value (base on the present value of its future earnings) to determine if the price is attractive. Remember that intrinsic value is never static and changes constantly with market forces.